Wood Smoking

WHY SMOKE MEAT

The short, but to the point answer here is simple. Flavour.

Smoking of meat is when flavour is added while cooking. Smoke is generated by combustion and each fuel source produces it’s own unique smoke flavour.

CHUNKS VS CHIPS

We have now established that smoke is created by combustion. Larger sizes of wood, like chunks, will burn slower thus giving you more control of your smoking period.

HOW TO SMOKE MEAT

Soaking smoking wood in water is a misconception. Water only penetrates the outer surface of the wood while leaving the inside dry. Adding wet wood to your coals will result in the chunks smouldering instead of combusting therefore creating a thick white smoke. Exactly what you don’t want. The best kind of smoke is almost invisible and a light blue colour. Clouds of thick white smoke is undesirable and will give the meat a bitter taste.

Get your Kamado JAN up to temperature and add 2 – 3 chunks directly to the coals. Some smokers place one of the first chunks directly in the centre and the others just away from the centre so they combust as the fire spreads outwards. There is no exact rule as to how much you should use. Beef and pork will require more smoke than poultry. For example, to smoke just a few chicken wings, you will need only one chunk. For a 10 hour brisket smoke, you can start with 2 – 3 chunks and add one at a time every hour or as needed.

WHAT FLAVOUR SHOULD I USE?

Here also there is no rule. Below is a guide to indicate which wood is best with each meat, but it really comes down to your personal preferred taste. So try a few to find your favourite smoke.

WOOD CHUNKS CHART FOR WEB_2